Flowers, Flowers Everywhere

In my Ramble post, I promised post pictures of some of the plants in my yard. This post will have little to do with writing and everything to do with fulfilling that promise.

(That said, it is also important to fulfill any promises made to readers in fictional works. Conflict implied in an opening needs to come to some sort of resolution by the ending. Otherwise, readers/viewers/listeners feel cheated. I think we’ve all experienced that feeling.)

A Spring Day Without Snow

Apple Branches - © Ann M. Lynn

This apple tree is huge. These are some of the lower branches.

Apple Blossoms Closeup - © Ann M. Lynn

These apple blossoms overhang a bench.

Unknown purple flower - © Ann M. Lynn

This is one of the many unidentified plants growing in my yard. They grow in the sunny spots as a clumping ground cover and are more purple in real life.

Various unidentified shrubs, ground covers, and other perennials that have pink, yellow, and white flowers grow in seemingly random locations around my small yard (less than a quarter-acre)  along with grape hyacinth, irises, tulips, snapdragons, and Virginia creeper.

The irises, ranunculus, a snowball bush, and smaller flowering plants are beginning to bloom. My roses won’t start blooming until June, when there is almost no chance of snow.

I might forget to share more photos of my yard’s flora. If I do and you want to see more, feel free to remind me.

Added 5/26/2010:

Ranunculus Flowers © Ann M. Lynn

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3 thoughts on “Flowers, Flowers Everywhere

  1. The flowers in your third photo are violets. Thanks for sharing. I love flowers and I enjoy seeing what grows around those I’ve met online.

    And yes, it is our responsibility to keep our promises to our readers. This is something I’ve become increasingly aware of as I’ve started writing more short stories.

    1. Violets? Really? I’ve always heard that violets are temperamental houseplants. These violets are so easy to maintain. Thanks, Linda; I’m glad you could tell what they are!

  2. The temperamental houseplants are African violets … a whole different species.

    I’ve always loved violets, though my father considered them a nuisance because they spread and took over his lawn or flower beds.

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